Turkish F-16 jets

Showing no respect for Christian Holy Days and the death of Jesus Christ, Turkey violated Greek airspace a total of 48 times on Good Friday.

In a five minute period, a pair of Turkish F-16 jets entered Greek airspace without submitting a flight plan flew over Farmakonisi, Lipsi, Arkios, Grylousa, Anthropofagoi and Fourni, and then flew over Chios, according to Infognomon.

This is the flight path of the pair of Turkish jets who violated Greek airspace on Good Friday:

  • Farmakonisi at 29,000 feet at 18:29
  • Lipsi at 28,000 feet at 18:30
  • Arkios and Grylousa at 27,000 feet at 18:31
  • Fourni at 27,000 feet at 18:32
  • The east coast of Chios at 5,000 feet, at 18:39 and 10 minutes later over the southeast coast of Chios at 10,000 feet.

Earlier in the day, a pair of Turkish F-16’s and a single Turkish F-16 flew over Rhodes at 15,000 feet.

In all cases, the Turkish aircrafts were identified and intercepted by respective Greek fighters.

Despite coronavirus ripping through Turkey with over 80,000 cases and 1,800 deaths, it has not relented in its violations against Greek air and maritime space.

With Turkey in a deep economic crisis and poverty exponentially rising, somehow the country always has enough money in its military adventurism rather than to the benefit of their own people.

This year so far, Turkey has attempted to invade Syria’s Idlib province, failed to defeat the Libyan National Army, and botched its asymmetric invasion of Greece with illegal immigrants. In all three attempts of power projections, Turkey utterly failed.

However, despite these failures, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has buckled down and continued a policy of aggression against Greece in his misguided hope that one day he may control the eastern Aegean islands.

Although Turkey expected a 5% economic growth this year, the International Monetary Fund has said its economy will actually contract by 5%. Such a contraction will be another major blow to Erdoğan’s goal of making Turkey a Top 10 economy by 2023. Since embarking on this goal, Turkey’s economic ranking has actually dropped instead of pushing towards the Top 10.