Cyprus is reopening relations with Syria 2

Cypriot Foreign Minister Nikos Christodoulidis addressed Radio Proto on foreign policy, commenting on yesterday’s teleconference with Greece, France, Egypt, and the United Arab Emirates, while sending his own response to Turkey, according to Cyprus’ Sigmalive.

The Foreign Minister held a teleconference with his Greek, Egyptian, Emirati and French counterparts on developments in the Eastern Mediterranean, as reported by Greek City Times.

He stated that the teleconference was held on the occasion of Turkey’s illegal actions, that include violating Greek airspace and illegal attempts to drill for resources in Cyprus’ Exclusive Economic Zone. He added that the conference call was not a Greek lobby and that Greece and Cyprus could not influence countries such as France, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt. Rather, these five countries are a coalition with mutual interests.

He also noted that Syria appealed to the United Nations not to ratify the Muslim Brotherhood Libyan-Turkey agreement to carve up Greek maritime space between them.

He stressed that Turkey is involved in the internal affairs of other countries, while violating the embargo after sending weapons to Libya, as well as instrumentalising immigration for their own benefit.

Most important however is that he said the Cyprus diplomatic mission in Syria was reopening.

This comes as only last week the Greek Foreign Ministry finally announced a restoration of relations between Greece and Syria and assigned former ambassador to Syria and Russia, Tasia Athanassiou, as a Special Envoy of Greece’s Foreign Ministry for Syria, as reported by Greek City Times.

The Athenian and Nicosian reopening of relations with Damascus comes at a time when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is making a strong push for a “Blue Homeland” that aims to annex Greece’s Eastern Aegean islands and Cypriot maritime space. Turkey for nine years attempted to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from power through various means, including an unsuccessful invasion attempt of Idlib province earlier this year, as well as its continued support for terrorist organisations. In addition, Turkey is propping up the Muslim Brotherhood government in Libya by importing jihadists from Syria to the North African country.

Although Turkey has failed in all of these endeavours, it still remains a major threat, even at a time when it is facing economic catastrophe with the Turkish lira at a near record low to the U.S. dollar and Turkey’s three largest banks, Garanti, Akbank and İşbank, on the verge of bankruptcy.

The Cypriot reopening of relations with Syria is another major blow to Turkey. It can now be expected with Greece and Cyprus now restoring relations with Syria, other European Union member states will slowly start doing the same, making it difficult for Turkey to legitimise its backing of terrorists and occupation of Syrian territory.

Turkey’s constant aggression against Greece and Cyprus has spurred these two countries to reopen relations with Syria that should have never been closed, and now, Turkey is more lonely and isolated than ever.

X