These are Mitsotakis’ two goals with the cabinet reshuffle: Analyst assesses developments

Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

Following the announcement of reshuffling the Mitsotakis government, rumors surfaced that the government was reportedly heading for early elections in the autumn.

The long-term goal and the election scenario

“With this move, the prime minister is protecting his opportunity to resort to the popular mandate, if he finally wants to hold elections.”

The thoughts of Mitsotakis was assessed by Dimitris Mavros, CEO of MRB, when estimating to Sputnik Hellas, that this is the long-term goal of the prime minister.

Maximos Palace
© PHOTO: MENELAOS MYRILLAS / SOOC

“Elections are not an end in themselves. However, the prime minister includes politicians in the government and not technocrats in order to preserve the opportunity to go to the polls,” he added.

Asked about this, he said that an election in the autumn would be an ideal opportunity for Mitsotakis as the results of the European financial support package would have begun to appear.

The short-term goal of the restructuring

At the same time, he estimates that the short-term goal of Mitsotakis is to show society that he wants to move fast with people with whom he has “chemistry” and communication:

Meeting of the Council of Ministers at the Maximos Palace.
© PHOTO: NICK PALEOLOGOS / SOOC

“The reshuffle has been in the prime minister’s mind for a long time. He wants to show that he is not just a ‘player,’ but also a ‘coach.’ He Wants to have full control of the required changes,” he said.

Mitsotakis mixed some positions in the government to have “chemistry” and communication with the people he chose.

The aim was to find a “conjuncture glade” so that it could carry out the restructuring.

“The conjunctures were connected with the coronavirus  and with the attitude of the opposition towards specific ministers such as Kikilias, Kerameos and Staikouras. The quarantine did not allow decisions to be made,” Mavros said, adding:

“So he chose to protect some and displace others, now that the sky is no longer rainy, but it has enough clouds on a political level.”

The hidden measurements for the fears of the Greeks

At the same time, the experienced analyst estimates that citizens want immediate structural changes that will be shielded by the onset of the pandemic.

Conference of the Central Political Committee of the Movement for Change
© PHOTO: GEORGE VITSARAS / SOOC

“People are asking for speed in reorganizing their lives. According to what we see even in our secret measurements, the Greek goes from fear of not getting sick, to fear of how they will live,” he said.

“This has to do with living standards and quality of life. People are wondering about the impact that the coronavirus will have on their lives,” Mavros continued.

“The prime minister listened in the summer to the suggestions of many who told him not to go to the polls so as not to show old-party perceptions,” Mavros explained.

“The second wave of the pandemic, however, changed the situation with the image of the government facing some substantial shocks. So the changes in the government structure, serve its short-term and long-term planning,” he concluded.

The new faces of the Mitsotakis government and the departures

Takis Theodorikakos
© PHOTO: SOOC / MENELAOS MYRILLAS

Former government representative, Stelios Petsas, is moving to the Ministry of Interior as Deputy Minister, Sofia Zacharaki is taking over as Deputy Minister of Tourism, while the current Deputy Minister of Interior, Theodoros Libanios, is taking over as Deputy Prime Minister.

New faces in the government are the deputy ministers:

  • Education: Zetta Makri and Angelos Syrigos
  • Labour: Maria Syregela
  • Environment: George Amyras
  • Culture: Nikolas Giatromanolakis
  • Justice: George Kotsiras
  • Interior (under the responsibility of Macedonia-Thrace): Stavros Kalafatis

Also, the deputy ministers:

  • Digital Governance: George Stylios
  • Shipping: Costas Katsafados
  • Rural Development: Giannis Oikonomou
  • Immigration and Asylum: Sofia Voultepsi