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The Louvre returns three marble relief plaques to Thasos

The Louvre returns three marble relief plaques to Thasos

The Louvre returns three marble relief plaques to Thasos

A few days ago, the archeological museum of Thasos received three antique relief plaques.

They have been on display at The Louvre, the world’s largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, since they were found during excavations in the ‘Passage of Theories’ in the second half of 19th century.

Director of the Ephorate of Antiquities of Kavala-Thassos Stavroula Dadaki pointed out, “the three reliefs were found fallen in the corridor, in 1864, by archaeologist Emmanuel Miller, in the first substantial excavation attempt attempted in Thasos.”

“Inscribed stones bearing the names of lords of the island were found, hence the name theory he gave. The reliefs were moved to Paris and have been on display at the Louvre since then,” she added.

The reliefs occupied a central position in the Passage des Theories, an important and expensively constructed structure (walls of marble orthostates) at the northeast corner of the Agora.

They date between 480-475 BC and are important evidence of the sculptural art that flourished on the island since archaic times.

The French Archaeological School of Athens and the Ephorate of Antiquities of Kavala-Thassos, are planning a number of events during summer to honour the return.

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