Hanukkah sling stone that was used against Jewish rebels more than 2,000 years ago bears the name of a Greek king Diodotus Tryphon

A lead sling stone bearing the name of Seleucid ruler Diodotus Tryphon, who waged war against the Hasmoneans.

A lead sling stone bearing the name of the Greek King Seleucid ruler Diodotus Tryphon, who waged war against the Hasmoneans.

The stone was discovered at Tel Zif in the southern Hebron Hills and measures some three centimetres (1.2 inches) long. It bears a clearly legible Greek inscription that includes the name of Diodotus Typhon, who controlled the Seleucid Empire from 142-183 BC, and the symbol for the Greek god Zeus.

Hanania Hizmi, the officer in charge of the Archaeology Unit in the IDF Civil Administration, said, “I welcome the discovery of this impressive artifact, which joins other artifacts discovered by the Civil Administration in recent years.

“We continue to uncover new findings that comprise another layer of the rich history that occurred in Judea and Samaria hundreds and thousands of years ago,” Hizmi said.

“The Civil Administration will continue to work tirelessly to preserve and excavate archaeological sites as well as national heritage and cultural properties throughout Judea and Samaria,” Hizmi said.

Hasmonean was a dynasty of Jewish Kings who fought to liberate Judea from the Seleucid rule, which was a Greek dynasty ruling over a large portion of the Middle East. 

The ancient battle began when the Hasmoneans spotted Seleucid soldiers stationed in the fortress that sat on a hill overlooking the Hellenistic city of Maresha.

No fighting was done inside the structure, but the Jewish rebels knock down the roof that led to the walls collapsing – and then they set their enemy fortress ablaze.

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