Why I May Never be Done with Mykonos

A travel guide by Gina Lionatos

For many travellers, a trip to Greece is not complete without a few days in Mykonos. Like most Greek-somethings, the Cycladic island of fun is a place I have visited more than a few times over the years of Greek Summers. I had swum at Ornos, I’d danced on tables with the Rich and Famous at Nammos, I’d watched the sun rise over Cavo Paradiso and danced to many a sun set at Kalua (and countless other Mykonos Memories). This year, as I jumped on the fast boat (2.5 hours from the port of Rafina), I couldn’t help but ask myself, was there anything left for me in Mykonos? I set out for 3 days of The Good Life, determined to uncover more Mykonian treasures – new and old.

Day 1

Breakfast on-the-go from Istories Gefseon, Ornos

Greek bakeries are a thing of beauty, aren’t they? One glance at the endless array of homemade savoury pites and sweet pastries, and the previous 6 months of #BikiniBody diets and gym workouts are a distant memory. Grab yourself one of everything packeto (to-go) at this family-run establishment, plus a Freddo Capuccino of course, and hit the road.

Pure Greek magic at Agios Sostis beach

Few people associate Mykonos with quiet beaches, especially ones that are void of any sun beds and the laid-back house tunes we’ve become accustomed to in Greece. However, when you arrive at the lookout of Agios Sostis beach, you know you’ve arrived somewhere very, very special. Walking past the tiny little church and down the steps to the beach, you’re greeted by the simple beauty of turquoise waters and rocks, and a few scattered beach towels and umbrellas (B.Y.O beach gear). After an hour or two of blissful swimming, the wafts of charcoal and meat aromas from the neighbouring taverna will be too much to resist…

Lunch at the famed Kiki’s Taverna

Lunch at Kiki’s Taverna is no ordinary experience. This tiny, open air eatery doesn’t have a sign, doesn’t take reservations and doesn’t have electricity (they are open from 1pm-7pm). Aside from the amazing array of salads and foods brined in vinegar, everything is cooked over charcoal. The wait can be long (2 hours) but is sweetened by the complimentary rosè wine on offer and the tiny cove just steps away where you can head off for a swim. When it’s your turn to dine, ordering the pork chop is a must (it’s the house specialty) and as much calamari and fish as your heart desires. For the foodies out there, this just might be the most memorable experience of your Greek Summer.

Catch the sunset at Alemagou

This new kid on the beach bar block has brought their A-game. Come for the luxurious beach beds, stay for the lobster spaghetti. For those who can’t nab a cabana, head down before sunset for seriously good cocktails and soak up that Mykonos vibe while dancing away to tribal house music. 

Dinner, Cocktails and Dancing in Chora

The Mykonos Chora (town) is a crazy bustling place from July – August, and making it through the beautifully tiny alleys can feel like a gauntlet. Everyone who’s anyone will stop by the super slick Interni or Ling Ling for a meal and just a touch of posing (it’s OK, we’re on holiday and we’re tanned!). Once the posing is done, skip over to Little Venice for a few cocktails at your bar of choice like Caprice or Veranda. The spray of the waves crashing against the rocks may not do great things for your hair, but oh, your soul will thank you for it. Time to dance? Of course it is. Head to nearby Astra to hear the musical stylings of Greece’s best house DJ’s and dance under the “stars”.

Stay tuned for Day 2 on Mykonos, where we dip into crystal waters, get grilled and iced, dance with the Beautiful People, and discover the best time of the day to take the ultimate Mykonos profile pic.

 

Gina Lionatos

Writer

Gina is a proud Greek-Australian who is passionate about travel, writing and gastronomy. When she’s not wandering around new places searching for undiscovered experiences, she works in Marketing & Communications and runs her own Greek-inspired e-store called Homer St.

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