Ancient Greek tomb filled with gold, silver and bronze

Archaeologists have uncovered more than 3,500 objects in a Bronze Age warrior’s tomb in southwestern Greece.

The excavation sponsored by the University of Cincinnati and led by husband-and-wife archaeologists Jack Davis and Sharon Stocker near the ancient city of Pylos began in 2015.

In the same year, they uncovered an intact adult male skeleton of an ancient Greek warrior and excavated 1,400 objects including weapons, jewels, armour and silver and gold artefacts.

Since 2015, the number of artefacts recovered from the grave has reached over 3,500 including a historically significant Minoan stone called the Pylos Combat Agate and four signet gold rings with detailed images from Minoan mythology.

Ancient Greek tomb filled with gold, silver and bronze

Based on archaeological evidence of destruction, many scholars believe that the Mycenaeans invaded and conquered Crete around 1450BC.

The burial provides vital clues to the origin of Greek civilisation some 3,500 years ago.

Ancient Greek tomb filled with gold, silver and bronze

“This is a transformative moment in the Bronze Age,” said Dr Brogan, the Director of the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Centre for East Crete.

Director of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Dr James Wright, added that the grave lies “at the heart of the relationship of the mainland culture to the higher culture of Crete.”

Ancient Greek tomb filled with gold, silver and bronze

He continued that it will help scholars understand how the state cultures that developed in Crete were adopted into what became the Mycenaean palace culture on the mainland.

*File Photos. Images credit iefimerida

*Source: Express

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