New archaeological discoveries at temple dedicated to Zeus in southern Syria

Zeus Temple in Southern Syria.

The Sweida Antiquities Department has completed archaeological excavations for the current season in the eastern part of the Temple of Zeus in Qanawat village, southern Syria.

Zeus Temple in Southern Syria.
Zeus Temple in Southern Syria.

In a statement to SANA, the Head of Sweida Antiquities Department, Nashat Kiwan, said the small rooms were uncovered when rubble was removed and small doors were revealed.

SANA explained that part of the temple’s lower base and the water channel that passed through these newly discovered rooms fed parts of the temple and leads to a water tank.

Kiwan stated that the excavations was made by the Sweida Antiquities Department in conjunction with graduates and students of the Archeology Department at the Second College of Arts in Sweida.

The Majastous Temple of Zeus is one of the important archaeological landmarks in Qanawat in Syria‘s southern Sweida Governorate.

Zeus Temple in Southern Syria.
Zeus Temple in Southern Syria.

It dates back to the 1st century BC and was built by the Greeks.

During the Roman Empire, Qanawat was known as Kanatha (Κάναθα), one of many cities that made up the infamous Decapolis. Unfortunately, the town began to decline following the region’s Muslim Arab conquest and was eventually reduced to a poor village.