Today is National Pie Day. Pie creation can be traced back to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks

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January 23 is National Pie Day – not to be confused with National Pi Day, which is on March 14.

The ancient Egyptians are the earliest-known civilization to have had a pie dish. It typically consisted of a crust made from wheat, oats, rye, or barley and filled with honey. The ancient Greeks and Romans also had pastries similar to the modern-day pie. For instance, the Romans often coated meat with a pastry made of flour, oil, and water. However, this dough was only intended to preserve the meat, not eaten as a meal. A Roman cookbook entitled “Apicius,” dating back to the first century, was discovered to contain recipes similar to pie cases.

The first pie recipe published by the Romans was a rye-crusted goat cheese and honey pie, the pie council said in a news release.

The beloved pie we know today came to America with the first English settlers, according to the council. Initially, the “coffyn” crust wasn’t even eaten. It was just there to hold the filling during baking. It wasn’t until the American Revolution that the word “crust” was used instead.

Until the 15th century, pies usually only contained meat or fish, but they soon included fruits and custard. It is reported that the very first cherry pie was baked for Queen Elizabeth I during the 16th century. As English settlers arrived in America, pies came along with them. Early versions often had thick, heavy crusts of rough flour and suet. Pies soon became a trademark American dish and today are heavily associated with traditional American life. When soldiers were asked why they were going off to war during World War II, they replied, “For mom and apple pie.”

Make a Pie. Why don't you try out Milopita- Greek Apple Pie Recipe